Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
 
2022-1-MovingMountains-5 (1)_edited.jpg

When is Physical Therapy Necessary?

Doctors often recommend Physical Therapy (PT) for kids and teens who have been injured or who have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability.


After an injury, our Physical Therapists will work to decrease pain, improve movement, and help kids return to daily activities. They will teach kids exercises designed to help them regain strength and range of motion, and also show the children and families how to prevent future injuries.

Physical Therapy might be needed any time a problem with movement limits your child’s daily activities. Doctors often recommend Physical Therapy for kids with:

  • Sports injuries

  • Developmental delays

  • Cerebral Palsy

  • Genetic disorders

  • Orthopedic disabilities/injuries

  • Heart and lung conditions

  • Birth defects (such as Spina Bifida)

  • Effects of in-utero drug or alcohol exposure

  • Acute trauma

  • Head injury

  • Limb deficiencies

  • Muscle diseases

2022-1-MovingMountains-1.jpg

Treatment and Individualized Care for Each Child

Our therapists use a variety of treatments to help your child develop skills needed for daily tasks. During an initial evaluation and follow up treatments, our therapists may measure a child's flexibility and strength, analyze how your child moves, assess how your child interacts with their environment and people around them, identify existing and potential limitations, consult with other medical and school personnel about an individual education plan (IEP), and provide instructions for a home program.

This is accomplished through:

  • developmental activities, such as crawling and walking

  • balance and coordination activities

  • adaptive play

  • improving circulation around injuries by using heat, cold, exercise, electrical stimulation, massage, and ultrasound

  • training to build strength around an injury

  • flexibility exercises to increase range of motion

  • instruction on how to avoid injuries

  • safety and prevention programs

During a visit, our physical therapist may also:

  • measure a child's flexibility and strength

  • analyze how a child walks and runs (the child's gait)

  • identify existing and potential problems

  • consult with other medical, psychiatric, and school personnel about an individual education plan (IEP)

  • provide instructions for home exercise programs

  • recommend when returning to sports is safe

This is all so that the treatment plan they initially create with you, and the follow-up sessions, will all be individualized and focused on your child’s specific needs. In physical therapy, each child may take less or more time to reach their goals than others. Everyone is different and because of this, your therapist will watch your child’s progress and adjust their treatments as necessary. They may also teach and provide instructions on exercises to do at home between sessions. This will help them stay on track and keep improving. Our goal is to help your child reach theirs.

What is the Difference Between Physical and Occupational Therapy?

Physical Therapy helps children with:

  • Gross Motor Skills: coordination of large movements needed for play, dressing, bathing, and moving around in one’s environment

  • Strength and Stability: the ability to apply the required force and speed of movement to successfully complete activities or to maintain one position for a duration of time to complete tasks

  • Endurance: the ability to maintain activity for a prolonged duration of time needed to complete activities

  • Visual-Motor Skills: the ability to coordinate your eyes and movements needed to manipulate objects, throw or kick a ball …

  • Range of Motion: use of stretches or supports to allow the body to move as needed for daily tasks

Occupational Therapy helps children with:

  • Fine Motor Skills: coordination of small movements needed for coloring, writing, scissors use, getting dressed and play

  • Gross Motor Skills: coordination of large movements needed for play, dressing, bathing, and moving around in one’s environment

  • Strength and Stability: ability to apply the required force and speed of movement to successfully complete activities or to maintain one position for a duration of time to complete tasks

  • Range of Motion: use of stretches or supports to allow the body to move as needed for daily tasks

  • Endurance: the ability to maintain activity for a prolonged duration of time needed to complete activities

  • Visual-Perceptual Skills: how to interpret the visual world around us as well as provide organization to writing, art, play …

  • Visual-Motor Skills: the ability to coordinate your eyes and movements needed to manipulate objects, throw or kick a ball, feed yourself …

  • Cognitive Skills: safety, sequencing, organization …

  • Sensory Processing: body regulation needed for attention and processing to support leaning and development

  • Social Skills: the understanding of how to manage social interactions, emotions and communication

What does Physical Therapy for children look like?

Physical Therapy is a branch of therapy that helps children who have physical, sensory, cognitive, and neurological delays or impairments. Our therapists utilize skilled interventions along with play to address these areas of concern. These interventions support your child’s ability to function at home, school, and the community. It supports success in social interactions, play, self-care skills, sports, organizational skills, and attention.  Having the tools needed to succeed also boosts a child’s self-esteem and sense of accomplishment.

Pediatric, Pelvic, and Chiropractic Therapies

43-875 Washington St.

Suite G

Palm Desert, CA 92211

Monday-Friday

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.